Grants directed toward preventing or responding to hate incidents, connecting communities to reporting, education and training resources, and fostering community dialogue and healing. Populations served by this work might include communities of color, LGBTQIA+, faith-based communities and more.

  • Anti-Defamation League Mountain States (ADL)

    • $20,000 total with $9,500 from the Community Action Fund and $10,500 from the Jewish Life program area to fund general operating support in the ADL’s work as a leading voice and community resource in the fight against hate.
    • ADL is the foremost organization combatting anti-Semitism, bias and bigotry in the community, with a demonstrated 100+ year history. Building on the platform of this mission, ADL combats bullying in schools, assists law enforcement with effective and informed approaches to respond to hate crimes, establishes coalitions with community partners and convenes communities to facilitate organized community responses to hate-inspired atrocities. Last year, the regional ADL office responded to over 200 requests for assistance from individuals and institutions targeted by anti-Semitism, racism, homophobia, Islamophobia and other forms of hate. The past three years has evidenced a rise in incidents of hate unlike any other three-year period ADL has recorded since it began collecting data on such incidents about 30 years ago. The Foundation’s funding for the ADL will enable it to address the continued rise in hate and support its role as a resource in assisting those that are the targets of incidents of bias, bigotry and extremism.
  • Matthew Shepard Foundation (MSF)

    • $14,000 for general operating support for MSF to provide anti-hate crime training for law enforcement, deliver programming to increase awareness about anti-gay hate crimes and expand resources for LGTQIA+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and other terms) youth.
    • MSF’s overarching goal is to inspire individuals, organizations and communities to embrace the dignity and equality of all people, leading to a future without hate. Having begun its work in 1998 following a tragic anti-gay hate crime, all of MSF’s work serves the LGBTQIA+ community, as well as communities of racial/ethnic and religious minorities, and is an active participant in a considerable number of coalitions and partnerships including ADL, NAACP, the Center and various law enforcement agencies. The grant would help MSF continue programs in three areas: delivering hate crimes training for law enforcement and prosecutors; supporting the production and dissemination of the portfolio of multimedia works devoted to Matthew Shepard’s story (most notably, The Laramie Project), and strengthening the youth resource site, Matthew’s Place. They train members of the criminal justice system to identify, investigate and report hate crimes, and to fill the gap in established training curriculum and bringing their hate crimes trainings to the counties surround Denver.
  • Motus Theater

    • $14,000 to support the Shoebox Stories performances during the week of Martin Luther King Junior day in January 2020.
    • Motus is a uniquely designed theater focused on creating performance that facilitates dialogue about social justice topics. It aims to give a voice to commonly marginalized groups by offering a platform for individuals to share their stories and experiences. Through partnerships with businesses and organizations across the greater Boulder region, Motus brings together diverse audiences and broadens understanding on issues related to immigration, discrimination and hate with the overarching goal of building alliances and empathy within the community. Among their partners are the Boulder Chamber of Commerce, the Boulder Jewish Community Center and the Youth Opportunities Advisory Board. This grant will support the Shoebox Stories monologue series, which allows community leaders to stand in another person’s shoes by reading their story to an audience. Motus has used this performance style to successfully engage storytellers and those who may not typically understand their experiences. For example, in April of 2017, Motus presented a series with law enforcement leaders of Boulder County reading the monologues of undocumented citizens. The Shoebox Series performed in January will present the monologues of undocumented leaders and women living in sanctuary in Colorado.
  • Muslim Youth for Positive Impact (MYPI)

    • $20,000 to support the launch of a Muslim Youth Mentorship Program.
    • Muslim Youth for Positive Impact is a well-connected community organization based in the north Denver metro area that aims to foster community relationships particularly within the Colorado Muslim community. The rise in anti-Muslim sentiment has led to increases in school bullying, anti-Muslim hate crimes and discrimination experienced by Muslim Americans, especially Muslim youth. There is an immediate need for proactive measures to build Muslim youth resiliency and strengthen their support systems. The MYPI Mentorship Program will empower Islamic youth to make a positive impact on their communities, environment and relationships that promote responsible citizenship by pairing teens with inspiring Muslim adult role models who will be matched based on interests and background compatibility. MYPI has spent significant time planning the program and has a pipeline of families who have requested mentors for their teens. By April 2020, MYPI hopes to have 50 mentor-mentee pairs.
  • One Colorado

    • $14,000 total, to support the Freedom for All Coloradans Coalition, organized by One Colorado.
    • One Colorado is the state’s leading advocacy organization dedicated to advancing equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQIA+) Coloradans and their families. In 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the Civil Rights Act of 1964 guarantees protections from workplace discriminations for LGBTQIA+ individuals. In response to this pending decision, One Colorado is building the Freedom for All Coloradans Coalition to respond to a decision that could be potentially devastating to Colorado’s LGBTQIA+ community. This grant funding will support outreach and advocacy efforts prior to and during the hearing of arguments in the Supreme Court case. One Colorado will also add more members to the Coalition, including business owners, religious leaders, child and family welfare advocates and members of law enforcement. This grant will allow One Colorado to engage the Coalition through story collecting and storytelling about the impact of religious exemption laws; elevate business voices around the imperative need for federal nondiscrimination protections; engage conservative faith leaders for their support of LGBTQIA+ protections; and launch a public education campaign to increase awareness of the harms of discrimination under the guise of religious exemption laws.
  • Out Boulder County (OBC)

    • $16,500 to support Out Boulder County’s partnerships with the Boulder Police Department and the Boulder County District Attorney’s Office around reporting, investigating and prosecuting crimes against or involving LGBTQIA+ individuals.
    • OBC’s mission is to educate, advocate and provide services, programs and support for Boulder County’s LGBTQIA+ communities. Through activities, support groups and events in both Boulder and Longmont, they reach over 15,000 people each year. OBC hopes to increase visibility and reporting of hate/bias-based incidents against the LGBTQIA+ community and build trust and rapport between local law enforcement and victim’s advocates, and the LGBTQ individuals that they serve, by developing and implementing a LGBTQIA+ awareness and inclusivity training. Sensitivity training for law enforcement personnel is especially important because LGBTQIA+ individuals are disproportionately affected by crime. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 44 percent of lesbian women, 40 percent of gay men, 46 percent of bisexual women, 47 percent of bisexual men and 47 percent of transgender individuals have experienced sexual violence during their lifetime. A 2018 OBC survey found that 46 percent of transgender individuals and 29 percent of LGBTQIA+ people of color have experienced a bias or hate crime. In addition, 71 percent of transgender respondents stated they had been verbally assaulted. Less than 25 percent of these incidents were reported to police.
  • The GLBT Community Center of Colorado

    • $14,000 in general operating funds to GLBT Community Center of Colorado (The Center) to support its work with partner agencies to create a network of safe spaces for LGBTQIA+ persons as well as other populations targeted by hate.
    • The Center is a trusted resource for the LGBTQIA+ community and has many robust connections with the communities it serves. In response to very real threats of continued harassment and violence, The Center provides valuable resources and tools for their community members to feel safe. The Center was directly involved with Denver Police Department’s efforts to launch the “Safe Place” campaign to educate area businesses, organizations and schools on hate crime prevention and reporting. The Center is currently developing a toolkit for use in reporting hate crimes. To address community-driven concerns, The Center will expand community education efforts to increase knowledge of LGBTQIA+ issues and promote LGBTQIA+ visibility. Outreach includes a corporate training program for businesses who sponsor Pride events and training for medical professionals who work with the transgender community. In addition to ongoing efforts like Rainbow Alley for LGBTQIA+ teens and Lunch & Learns for older LGBTQIA+ adults, The Center continues to convene moderated community discussions throughout the year; previous panels have included LGBTQIA+ law enforcement professionals and LGBTQIA+ members of the Jewish community.
  • Together Colorado

    • $14,000 in general operating support for Together Colorado’s leadership of conversations around hate, racism and anti-Semitism in faith-based communities and institutions.
    • Together Colorado addresses the issues of hate, discrimination, racism and anti-Semitism facing communities. Their belief is that faith communities are uniquely suited for organizing the critical work of building civic life, bridging divides, confronting racism and hate and fostering faith narratives and dialogue around inclusion, belonging and healing. Their work is explicitly aimed at creating cadres of leaders and clergy who are willing to dive into the difficult conversations, analyses, self-confrontation, healing and reconciliation work necessary to more powerfully and effectively lead their communities in addressing and confronting, hate, racism and anti-Semitism. Activities include a yearly two-and-a-half-day intensive training for 40 leaders focused on undoing racism with the People’s Institute; monthly race caucuses (white and people of color caucuses); quarterly Healing Circle gatherings between race caucuses; regional trainings on anti-Semitism by either the ADL or Faith in Action; training and development of 1,000 volunteer leaders and clergy in the art of relational organizing; and expansion of statewide clergy membership into Adams County and four rural communities to provide a statewide moral response to incidents of hate, discrimination, racism and anti-Semitism.
  • Colorado Resilience Collaborative – University of Denver

    • $14,000 to fund the Colorado Resilience Collaborative (CRC) in its work to prevent, intervene and respond to identity-based violence.
    • The CRC is housed within the University of Denver Graduate School of Professional Psychology’s International Disaster Psychology Program, where it provides training and resources toprofessionals and community services to diverse populations through the Trauma and Disaster Recovery Clinic. The CRC works to prevent, intervene and respond to identity-based violence through education and training, applied research, consultation and referral services and partnerships. The CRC is currently partnering with such diverse groups as the Anti-Defamation League, Homeland Security and the FBI as well as local law enforcement and metro area schools. The community-based program is recognized internationally as a model in the fight against violence and extremism and is actively expanding these collaborative partnerships. The CRC focus areas include: preventing and responding to identity-based violence (hate crimes, discrimination, bias-motivated acts, etc.) to support those affected by such acts; and preventing and disrupting those who are on the pathway to violent extremism, also known as targeted violence, in which a person or entity may be attacked because of identity. Funding will support the CRC director, one graduate assistant, supplies and printing, and an interpreter for community presentations in order to expand partnerships and awareness of the resources the CRC provides.